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Twisted Bracelet - Gold Plated
Quantity:  2.90

Celtic women and men liked to wear jewellery. They wore rings, on their toes as well as their fingers, bracelets, armbands, torcs and necklaces.

Torcs were a distinctive item of Celtic jewellery. Made mainly of bronze, they were worn around the neck, upper arm or wrist. Similar designs were worn in Roman times and have varied in style of adornment for over two thousand years.

This Twisted Bracelet is made from metal and is gold plated. The information card is full colour on the front and has historical information on the reverse.

 
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