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Greek Corinthian Helmet Thimble
Quantity:  6.00

The Corinthian helmet originated in ancient Greece and took its name from the city state of Corinth. It was a helmet made of bronze which in its later styles covered the entire head and neck, with slits for the eyes and mouth.

They usually had lines etched into the metal that follow the edges around the head, face and eyes. Out of combat a greek Hoplite would wear the helmet tipped upward for comfort.

This miniature pewter Corinthian helmet is made from pewter and is supplied in a clear acetate box with information card that explains in detail about the helmet.

 
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